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Grimlock ♥ Inhumans

I'm a well read technosexual who's bluntly honest about all things, although I try to be most honest about myself.   

Currently reading

Saga Book One: Deluxe Edition
Fiona Staples, Brian K. Vaughan
Progress: 439/505pages
Deadpool Classic Vol. 20: Ultimate Deadpool
Kelly Doudna, Mark Bagley, Brian Michael Bendis
Altered Carbon
Richard K. Morgan
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Stephen King, Jordie Bellaire, Joëlle Jones
(First Signet Printing) the Mossad Inside Stories: Israel's Secret Intelligence Service Paperback By Dennis Eisenberg and Dan Uri (1979)
Dan Uri, Dennis Eisenberg
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Progress: 34/484pages
Marvel Super Heroes: Secret Wars Prose Novel
Alex Irvine
Progress: 15%
G.I. Joe (2013-2014) Vol. 2: Threat Matrix
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Fascinating look at Khan

Star Trek: Khan (Star Trek: Countdown to Darkness) - Paul Shipper, Claudia Balboni, Mike Johnson

While this is a fascinating look at Khan's history, it's also told in a memoir style, and called into question immediately after his trial.    (Yes, trial, but it was all one story and told as a huge flashback; the present was intercut every now and then, but really only at the beginning of the issues.)


It made the story flow well, while also bringing in the events of the movie, and tying them to the past.   The fact that Khan himself is an unreliable narrator should have been obvious from the start, but I got so caught up in the story of his life that I simply believed everything he said. 


I believe much of this is based on not only the original Star Trek episode about Khan, but also supplemental material - like the Eugenics War novel - but that's the impression that I got.   I haven't actually read The Rise and Fall of Khan, so I don't really know.   


And of course, much of this is altered to fit the new universe and the new movies, so I know that some of this diverged from the TOS canon itself.   Khan made a fascinating narrator and I can see some of why he became the way he is in the details of his past, but it did lack an emotional connection.   I suppose having Khan, who isn't super emotional, tell this story makes that emotional disconnect feel reasonable, and made the story more realistic.   (I can't see him telling this story affably or with any great emotion.)   The catch-22 is that it made me distanced from this story in an emotional way, and so even when the one thing that really mattered - him being reunited with the other augments, whom he considered not only his crew but his family - came up, I didn't feel much.   


I enjoyed this greatly despite the lack of emotional connection.   Also, I'm in a rush, so I'm going to leave this review here.