1480 Autobots
443 Decepticons
allhailgrimlock

Grimlock ♥ Vision

I'm a well read technosexual who's bluntly honest about all things, although I try to be most honest about myself.   

Currently reading

Evil Empire Vol. 1
Max Bemis, Mike Getty, Andrea Mutti
Progress: 15/116pages
Steven Universe Vol. 2
Rebecca Sugar, Coleman Engle, Jeremy Sorese
Ninjasaur
Jason Horn
Curb Stomp
Ryan Ferrier, Devaki Neogi Kiran
Progress: 17/115pages
Transformers: Autocracy Trilogy
Livio Ramondelli, Chris Metzen, Flint Dille
Progress: 23/335pages
Transformers and Philosophy: More than Meets the Mind
Geoffrey Allan Plauché, Liz Stillwaggon Swan, John R. Shook
Progress: 12/384pages
Star-Lord (2016-2017) Annual #1
Djibril Morissette-Phan, Chip Zdarsky, Kris Anka
Star Trek/Planet of the Apes: The Primate Directive
Rachael Stott, David Tipton, Scott Tipton
The Fathom Sourcebook #1
Hannibal Tabu, Michael Turner
Progress: 6/31pages
Doctor Strange and the Sorcerers Supreme (2016-) #1
Robbie Thompson, Rafael Albuquerque, Javier Rodriguez

Fun, but just that

Grumpy Cat - FCBD 2016 Edition (The Misadventures Of Grumpy Cat And Pokey Vol. 2) - Royal McGraw, Various, Various, Ken Haeser

This is fun, and there are little pokes at the comic book fandom.   Still, it's not half as clever as most parodies, or anything breaking the fourth wall, partly because it's not as self-aware.   These are just meant to be fun, whereas most parodies really play with the tropes, most times pointing out the flaws within said tropes.   Likewise, breaking the fourth wall is more effective when it has teeth: commenting on things that are harmful, or simply not well done. 

 

Grumpy Cat aims to be harmless fun, and it is that.   But it comes off at toothless: generic humor that doesn't really make a point except that, say, Superman vs. Batman was lame.   (Which is so almost universally agreed upon that even if it has a little teeth, it's little enough to feel toothless: it's okay, because it knows it won't upset most of the comics fandom.)

 

And this isn't a bad thing.   It was fun enough for that harmlessness.   It was amusing.   I just didn't feel as strongly about it as something that wasn't afraid to go for the jugular: that safety net made me feel like this was too strongly neutral about almost everything.  And I wanted to feel something about this.   It didn't have to get super intellectual, but something more clever wouldn't hurt.   (I like plenty of things that are good, harmless fun.   They do tend to have some sort of excellence about them, though: the writing, the ideas, the art, the execution, something.   This felt fairly average on top of not really wanting to hurt anything, even if it meant not really saying anything, and that made me like this a little less than those other good, harmless fun things that I've read.)