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420 Decepticons
allhailgrimlock

Grimlock ♥ Ultra Magnus

I'm a well read grad student who's bluntly honest about all things, although I try to be most honest about myself.   

Currently reading

All New Fathom Vol. 5
John Ercek, Erick Arciniega, Mark Roslan, Alex Konat, Beth Sotelo, David Wohl
Pocket Apocalypse
Seanan McGuire
Progress: 54%
Apex Magazine Issue 99
Allison Mills, Rebecca Roanhorse, Pamela Rentz, Mari Kurisato, Raymond Sturgis, Jason Sizemore, Daniel Heath Justice
Provenance
Ann Leckie
Progress: 148/432pages
Transformers Robots in Disguise: Where Crown City Comes to Life
Caroline Rowlands
Progress: 3/32pages
Avengers: Absolute Vision - Book Two (Avengers (1963-1996))
Brian Garvey, Jimmy Akin, Roger Stern, Steve Ditko, Carmine Infantino, Al Milgrom, Prentice Hall
Progress: 98/360pages
Deadpool Classic Vol. 20: Ultimate Deadpool
Kelly Doudna, Mark Bagley, Brian Michael Bendis
Altered Carbon
Richard K. Morgan
Progress: 67/516pages
Batman (2016-) #40
Stephen King, Jordie Bellaire, Joëlle Jones
(First Signet Printing) the Mossad Inside Stories: Israel's Secret Intelligence Service Paperback By Dennis Eisenberg and Dan Uri (1979)
Dan Uri, Dennis Eisenberg

Fun, but just that

Grumpy Cat - FCBD 2016 Edition (The Misadventures Of Grumpy Cat And Pokey Vol. 2) - Royal McGraw, Various, Various, Ken Haeser

This is fun, and there are little pokes at the comic book fandom.   Still, it's not half as clever as most parodies, or anything breaking the fourth wall, partly because it's not as self-aware.   These are just meant to be fun, whereas most parodies really play with the tropes, most times pointing out the flaws within said tropes.   Likewise, breaking the fourth wall is more effective when it has teeth: commenting on things that are harmful, or simply not well done. 

 

Grumpy Cat aims to be harmless fun, and it is that.   But it comes off at toothless: generic humor that doesn't really make a point except that, say, Superman vs. Batman was lame.   (Which is so almost universally agreed upon that even if it has a little teeth, it's little enough to feel toothless: it's okay, because it knows it won't upset most of the comics fandom.)

 

And this isn't a bad thing.   It was fun enough for that harmlessness.   It was amusing.   I just didn't feel as strongly about it as something that wasn't afraid to go for the jugular: that safety net made me feel like this was too strongly neutral about almost everything.  And I wanted to feel something about this.   It didn't have to get super intellectual, but something more clever wouldn't hurt.   (I like plenty of things that are good, harmless fun.   They do tend to have some sort of excellence about them, though: the writing, the ideas, the art, the execution, something.   This felt fairly average on top of not really wanting to hurt anything, even if it meant not really saying anything, and that made me like this a little less than those other good, harmless fun things that I've read.)