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allhailgrimlock

Grimlock ♥ Vision

I'm a well read technosexual who's bluntly honest about all things, although I try to be most honest about myself.   

Currently reading

Fairy Tail 6
Hiro Mashima
Progress: 139/208pages
Everbound
Brodi Ashton
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Mothering Sunday: A Romance
Graham Swift
Progress: 8/177pages
Trish out of Water Vol. 1
Studio Parlapa, Ruben Curto, Giuseppe Cafaro, Mirka Andolfo, Vince Hernandez
Progress: 39/120pages
Evil Empire Vol. 1
Max Bemis, Mike Getty, Andrea Mutti
Progress: 15/116pages
Steven Universe Vol. 2
Rebecca Sugar, Coleman Engle, Jeremy Sorese
Ninjasaur
Jason Horn
Curb Stomp
Ryan Ferrier, Devaki Neogi Kiran
Progress: 17/115pages
Transformers: Autocracy Trilogy
Livio Ramondelli, Chris Metzen, Flint Dille
Progress: 23/335pages
Transformers and Philosophy: More than Meets the Mind
Geoffrey Allan Plauché, Liz Stillwaggon Swan, John R. Shook
Progress: 12/384pages

So, I loved this until the ending

Batman (2016-) #24 - Tom King, Jordie Bellaire, David Finch, Danny Miki, Clay Mann, Seth Mann

This was a more nuanced look at Batman, and what it means to be Batman, than I'd suspected when I first started reading.  On some level, it's fairly matter-of-fact, but if you want, there's much more to mine in this issue. 

 

The way that Batman deals with Claire is different than he does with any of his Robins, or Batgirl, or Batwoman.   Of course it is, although it's not because she's a girl.   He simply doesn't know her, and hasn't trained with her, or fought by her side as much as he had with any of the others. 

 

I think, given all she's lost, and given that it was her brother who really wanted to be the superhero, that it explains the difference.   Once someone committed in their world, they committed fully; they didn't fight, or hope for Bruce Wayne, or Batman, to tell them what to do.  A lack of commitment would have gotten Wayne himself, and thus Batman, killed over and over again.   How could he possibly tell a woman to fight if she wasn't sure she wanted to, on his word, and then expect her not to be killed?   (Since using her powers kills her, he couldn't possibly tell her anything expect 'do what you can do without using your powers,' too.)

 

And because he lets her in so closely, because her circumstances match his, and because she's so uncertain, they talk frankly about this life and if he's happy.   Which leads us to the ending. 

 

Which I found, quite frankly, forced.  I wonder if King was told to make this move, to be honest, which would be quite a departure from DCs earlier stance on the subject of superhero marriage.  Or maybe it's not: maybe there's a character death in the near future, although I doubt it given whom he proposed to.  Maybe she'll just laugh it off and say no, although I doubt it given what King's been building up to in this series.  I can't decide if she'll take time, or just say yes, although I'm really, really hoping it's not an immediate yes!

 

I really enjoyed this episode up until the last scene.   I finally nailed down why I felt it so forced at the time: given the talk throughout this issue, Bruce seems to have had these issues of happiness on his mind for a while.   Why he's Batman, and if that means he can be happy.   And yet, one talk later and he makes this huge commitment?   This from the man that researches everything?   This from the man who knows what a huge clusterfuck this can become?

 

I don't buy it.   I think he would at least take time to think about it, and I seriously hope the unnamed she does.